Artesia On Our Minds — An Immigration Attorney’s Diary of a Detention Camp

photo-60Immigration attorney Helen Lawrence, who has helped ACJP families beat deportation cases, recently went to the Artesia immigration detention facility in New Mexico that houses women and children to provide pro-bono legal services.  Read about her powerful reflections on her experiences.

This past week I went with a 10-attorney contingent from the Bay Area to provide pro-bono legal services for a week in an immigration detention center in Artesia, New Mexico that holds between 400-500 ​women and children who were detained in the border refugee crisis this summer. Our primary purpose was to represent women and children in bond and asylum cases in this remote facility. We are all still unpacking the experience.

Our arrival ​day felt full of prescient moments. During our 4am ride to the airport, when our Senegalese Uber driver learned where we were headed and what we were headed to do, he played Redemption Song for us, hopefully setting the tone for this trip.​ ​On the four and a half hour drive from Albuquerque to Artesia under the big New Mexican skies, we encountered rainstorms and tumbleweeds. Continue reading

Family and ACJP Set Precedent in Stopping ICE Hold for Juvenile in San Mateo County

jairphotoRosario came to us at De-Bug last week for assistance regarding her son who had an immigration detainer hold at San Mateo County’s juvenile hall. We helped her create a “mitigation packet” — a package of letters, photos, and history that would be used to tell the fuller story of her son. He had already spent a good 7 months at camp, had an excellent report card, supportive probation officers, and a dedicated mom who kept every single certificate her son earned in school and at camp.  In San Mateo County, Probation Chief John Keene stopped the practice of referring juveniles to ICE on a routine basis, except for ‘rare and exceptional cases’ — in which he would have the sole power of deciding whether or not to transfer a youth to ICE custody.  This practice came after a four year campaign by the San Mateo County Coalition for Immigrants Rights, which De-Bug is a part of, to reverse this harsh policy.  This mitigation packet was to be presented to the Chief to ask him not to enforce an ICE hold on Rosario’s son.

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Time Saved Photo Essay: Cesar Beats Wrongful Sentence and Deportation

Cesar003Cesar’s family came to De-Bug almost at their wit’s end.  Their son was nearing the end of his 9 year prison sentence and was facing imminent deportation.  During the 9 years, his family had searched for a lawyer, only to be told it was too complicated.  However, we helped find a fierce immigration lawyer and advocate in Helen Lawrence to complete our team.  “Team Cesar” — his family, church, and community support — put together an almost 200 page mitigation packet of Cesar’s life; helped find experts for his case; organized community support at hearings; conducted fundraisers for his legal defense. His entire community bonded together to help push for Cesar’s release, which resulted in a habeas release granted in criminal court, re-sentencing, and a bond hearing in immigration court that freed Cesar from almost 10 years in custody (almost 9 years in prison, and over a year in immigration detention).  Click here to hear his story and see the photo essay.  Photography by Charisse Domingo

The “Storify” of Santa Clara County Preserving the Best Immigrant Detainer Policy in the Country

Media coverage, and our own media, chronicling the culmination of a year long campaign to beat back a challenge to our county’s immigrant detainer policy. This win for public safety & immigrants rights is a result of efforts by the FIRE Coalition, the Public Defender’s Office, and wisdom of the BOS. (Click here or image to go to Storify page that has videos, articles, infographics, tweets, and more from the win!)

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In the Isolation of Immigration Court, A Son Finds His Mother

 

 

 

cesar2Immigration court in San Francisco has two branches — one for those in custody, and ones for those who have been released.  For those in custody, they remain shackled, are dressed in ICE jail clothes of green and soft orange shoes, and cannot have any contact with family or friends who are there to support them.  Even when their case is up for deliberation, they remain in chains.

Usually, the courtrooms for the detained are deserts. It is the detainee, sometimes with their attorney, against the prosecutor and the judge.  But yesterday, for this young man’s court, 16 people filled the courtroom.  He had his fierce attorney by his side.  And in the seats — family, clergy of various faiths, De-Bug, a San Mateo County District Attorney and a Private Defender who had helped see him through his case, sat to bear witness, to support, and to send a message that there is a community of people who want this young man home.

This is a picture of him and his mother holding each other for a brief moment, after nearly 8 months in ICE custody. This young man is now in his 30′s, but in this moment of embrace, he is the loved child, holding his mother tight in a difficult time. – Photo and Submission Post by Charisse Domingo

Sentencing Project and First Focus Publication: “Children in Harm’s Way”

Screen Shot 2013-02-06 at 3.57.27 PM“It was the policy of the San Mateo County juvenile probation department to report youth to immigration enforcement officials regardless of the nature of their juvenile offense and before youth had even seen a juvenile court judge or met with their defense attorneys. In Yareli’s case, she had no idea that she was talking to an ICE official. She explained, “My probation officer asked me ‘do you have papers?’ I said no. I can’t lie to them, so I said no. Then they told me to go talk to this person. He just started asking me questions, and at  the end he said, ‘By the way, I’m an ICE agent.”

…The underlying purpose of the juvenile justice system is to rehabilitate youth and protect the community. In California, for example, the goals of the juvenile justice system include providing treatment that is in the minor’s best interest, rehabilitating youth, and preserving and reuniting families. Reporting youth to ICE directly undercuts these goals because it renders youth vulnerable to physical and emotional harm, undermines their prospects for rehabilitation, weakens family ties, and violates the foundational principles of the juvenile justice system to help youth successfully transition into adulthood.”

– Excerpt from “Two-Tiered System for Juveniles”, co-written by Angie Junck (ILRC), Charisse Domingo (De-Bug), and Helen Beasley (CLSEPA)

The Sentencing Project and First Focus released a new publication this month called “Children In Harm’s Way” that highlights the experiences of those caught in the crossroads of the criminal justice, immigration, and child welfare systems.  One of the articles, “Two Tiered System for Juveniles” was co-authored by Charisse Domingo with Silicon Valley De-Bug’s ACJP, along with Angie Junck from the Immigrant Legal Resource Center and Helen Beasley from Community Legal Services in East Palo Alto.  This article highlights the practice of juvenile ICE holds in San Mateo County and the local coalition’s efforts to stop it.  It also features the story of an ACJP family who directly experienced the effects of this policy, and won her case through family, community and legal support.  To read their article and the full report, click here….

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Keeping Families Together — Using Photographs to Show Why Loved Ones Should Not Be Deported

cpThis week, we at ACJP worked with a family and their attorney to put together an almost 100 page mitigation packet to help support their loved one’s deportation proceedings and hopefully convince immigration officials to let their brother stay in the US.  Their brother and his siblings were victims of a horrific crime, one that has traumatized him and his family for years. 

One of the parts of the packet is a photo album of the family with their brother. Sifting through hundreds of photographs that their mother and sister very diligently kept, one photograph stood out.  This is a photo of the Christmas tree that they put up every year, and one of the most special ornaments is a picture of their brother with the family. He has spent nearly 9 Christmases away from them, struggling to fight his case.  They put the picture up as a loving message to him that he is with them, and hopefully soon enough –he will come home.